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Author Topic: Let's Get Political!  (Read 1019103 times)
horlock07

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« Reply #10395 on: Monday, September 14, 2020, 10:42:13 »

Hilariously, it turns out that the Japan deal the govt were so widely trumpeting last week actually commits the UK to stricter state aid rules than the ones proposed in negotiations with the EU which the govt is apparently so exercised about that it is proposing to turn the UK into international pariahs by breaking international law:

https://www.ft.com/content/edb7d155-56b4-4065-9f83-31b2247fa178

Shambles would be too kind a word.

Its hardly surprising that they cannot negotiate with the EU, they seem entirely incapable of discussing this within their own government.

I note from last evening that a fair few have been reporting the Braverman and Buckland (both Barristers) to the Bar Council as, rather unsurprisingly, it goes against their professional standards to actively advise your client, in full knowledge, to break the law.

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RWB Robin

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« Reply #10396 on: Monday, September 14, 2020, 12:31:12 »

Buckland said yesterday IF the government were to break the law he would resign.
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Bogus Dave
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« Reply #10397 on: Monday, September 14, 2020, 12:34:19 »

No he didnít. He said if they broke the law in a way he finds unacceptable
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Flashheart

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« Reply #10398 on: Monday, September 14, 2020, 12:35:09 »

Buckland said yesterday IF the government were to break the law he would resign.

Almost.

He said if the government break the law **in a manner he finds unacceptable** then he would resign.

Zero integrity.
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pauld
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« Reply #10399 on: Monday, September 14, 2020, 12:39:06 »

Buckland said yesterday IF the government were to break the law he would resign.
Not quite. He said he would resign if the government were to break the law "in a way that I find unacceptable" which is very different. The qualifier is everything and quite astonishing - as a QC, as a minister and as the Lord Chancellor he has signed up to codes of conduct and sworn oaths to uphold the rule of law. Not to uphold the bits he likes or finds "acceptable". The rule of law is, as Margaret Thatcher observed, fundamental to democracy and liberty: "The legal system we have and the rule of law are far more responsible for our traditional liberties than any system of one man one vote. Any country or Government which wants to proceed towards tyranny starts to undermine legal rights and undermine the law."

If the Internal Markets Bill passes in it's current form, Buckland and indeed all Tory MPs have a choice: they can support the government, or they can support the rule of law and democracy. Not both.
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horlock07

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« Reply #10400 on: Monday, September 14, 2020, 12:47:49 »

I don't have the local angle, so I wasn't aware that Buckland has history...

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jayohaitchenn
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« Reply #10401 on: Monday, September 14, 2020, 13:29:17 »

I don't have the local angle, so I wasn't aware that Buckland has history...



I remember the hammer attack story but I never knew Buckland was involved.

https://www.swindonadvertiser.co.uk/news/11353558.mother-of-school-hammer-attack-victim-calls-for-new-solicitor-general-robert-buckland-mp-to-quit/
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« Reply #10402 on: Monday, September 14, 2020, 13:37:00 »

that's new to me too
------
we all know the career minded snivelling arse and his North Swindon sidekick will vote with the government unless something severe happens
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horlock07

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« Reply #10403 on: Monday, September 14, 2020, 13:39:10 »

Going to be interesting to see what happens now Cox has come out very strongly against it, I recall his opinion held quite a lot of sway in the party previously.

I have no doubt that it will pass, then the fun will really start.
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pauld
Aaron Aardvark

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« Reply #10404 on: Monday, September 14, 2020, 14:18:16 »

IIRC Reg has mentioned it a few times, he's pulled me up on it when I'd mentioned that Buckland seemed decent enough. Certainly this Bill will be a litmus test for a lot of MPs
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RedRag

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« Reply #10405 on: Tuesday, September 15, 2020, 09:45:09 »

Going to be interesting to see what happens now Cox has come out very strongly against it, I recall his opinion held quite a lot of sway in the party previously.

I have no doubt that it will pass, then the fun will really start.
The distinction between Geoffrey Cox, QC, the previous Attorney General and Suella Braverman, "QC", as lawyers, is as stark can be.

When Mrs May had claimed that her revised agreement had meant "there would be nothing to prevent the UK instigating measures that would ultimately dis-apply the backstop", Cox gave his honest legal opinion that there was nothing in the agreement that would allow the UK to disapply the agreement unilaterally.

Whatever one's views on his politics, he remained a lawyer of independence, integrity as well as experience.

Braverman is a legal lightweight who owes becoming a QC not to the usual route but exclusively to Johnson's patronage.  Given an Attorney General's first duty is to uphold the law ahead of the interests of any client, her appointment could be seen as a joke.  Politically however, she is committed to ousting scrutiny by the Courts of the lawfulness of Government. 

Whatever your politics, the Supreme Court came down twice in favour of our elected Parliament, latterly to ensure Johnson could not abuse a prorogation power to shut it down. The Internal Market Bill now gives ministers the power, not only to interpret the Protocol, but to disapply or modify its effect to the extent of nullifying a treaty obligation entered into by the UK Government, as they see fit. 

It excludes parliamentary scrutiny and attempts to exclude judicial scrutiny of the lawfulness of all ministerial actions thereunder.  There is a distinctly un-British, totalitarian undercurrent to our Cummings-led Government, being disguised by Jester-in-Chief Johnson, as a defence of British interests.  We should be very wary.
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« Reply #10406 on: Tuesday, September 15, 2020, 10:15:15 »

The problem is, what can you actually do about it?

Pressure your MP as much as you like, snivelling career shits like Tomlinson and Buckland won't oppose Johnson.

Vote them out - a) too late b) the number of "yeahbutlabour would of" views I see are so depressing. And they are in fighgting still. And there isn't a credible opposition.

And so it my assumption, we're really up the junction to missquote Squeeze.
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RWB Robin

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« Reply #10407 on: Tuesday, September 15, 2020, 10:20:35 »

The one thing that will make them stop and think is if they get wind of the possibility of losing their seat. Most nationwide petitions are useless because they don't put any individual MP under pressure. Get up a petition (or equivalent) signed by a few thousand constituents and an MP will start watching what he does, and will challenge the leadership (government or opposition) much more readily.
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horlock07

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« Reply #10408 on: Tuesday, September 15, 2020, 10:26:33 »

Miliband was surprisingly good last night, or was it that Johnson is just downright dreadful?

https://twitter.com/PoliticsJOE_UK/status/1305546881272029188?s=20
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pauld
Aaron Aardvark

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« Reply #10409 on: Tuesday, September 15, 2020, 12:29:07 »

The one thing that will make them stop and think is if they get wind of the possibility of losing their seat. Most nationwide petitions are useless because they don't put any individual MP under pressure. Get up a petition (or equivalent) signed by a few thousand constituents and an MP will start watching what he does, and will challenge the leadership (government or opposition) much more readily.

Better yet a recall petition. If Buckland does eventually vote the law-breaking Illegal Market Bill through, there must be a case for a recall petition against him solely on grounds of integrity?
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