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Author Topic: Trivial things you don't understand/mildly annoy you  (Read 3508715 times)
Bob's Orange

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« Reply #34275 on: Tuesday, March 2, 2021, 10:51:48 »

I completely understand where you guys are coming from. Everyone has a different work attitude and aptitude and I know WFH is not for everyone. I guess what you say about travelling to London is a big part of it to be honest Abrahammer, if my office was say a 10 minute walk, or even a drive somewhere locally then I would probably be in the same boat as you.

FWIW, my work which is a Financial Services Company has already said that it's employees will drive how they wish to work in the future. We had a poll and not one person voted for 5 days a week in the office, I think the most popular choice was 2. We've renovated the office in CW so their is hot desking etc and I think they have reduced the number of floors they are going to populate.

I'm not one for social events particularly but I think around summer and Christmas time the urge to be physically in work might be increased. I've yet to try my new commute out, it could be a total joy! (It won't)
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« Reply #34276 on: Tuesday, March 2, 2021, 11:30:33 »

I work in Software Development and I think the general attitude to work from home was pretty good even before the pandemic, if you wanted to WFH you could just do it. I never really liked doing it until I had to, and I enjoyed the office banter (plus we had a playstation which was fun). Now I'm not so sure, I've got so used to home comforts I can't see myself ever working in an office full time again!
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horlock07

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« Reply #34277 on: Tuesday, March 2, 2021, 11:37:14 »

Agree with what you said. But my worry with the above is that since companies will look to reduce their bricks and mortar.

They undoubtedly will, its a big cost that many companies have realised that they don't really need.

I have bee WFH since 2015 when I dropped off the commuter treadmill into Manchester, gets a bit lonely at times (but that's what the TEF is for innit. Speak to colleagues on the phone very regularly through the day, plus the wife works from home as well (hence building a home office for me in the garden!)

From working in the sector what I see happening is a reduction in the big dick replacement corporate headquarters with smaller regional offices being open for hot desking. I imagine the big CBD's of this world, so CW in London and Spinningfields in Manchester will remain little altered, but the smaller provincial offices in towns will rapidly move over to residential use using the PD rights that already exist, which could also go some way to addressing a lot of housing shortages.

I did proper hot desking for a few years when I worked in  Wigan, albeit I spent most of my time driving 30odd k miles a year, it was a bit of a waste of time as everyone sat in the same places all the time anyway!

Working practices are changing and there is little anyone can do about it.
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Nemo
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« Reply #34278 on: Tuesday, March 2, 2021, 11:58:19 »

I'm also fully home working, have been since (just!) before the pandemic. There are bits of the office I miss, but the other side of it is I can go from living in a tiny flat in Zone 2 to living in a proper house wherever I like it a lower cost.

It'll cause some serious intended and unintended consequences though - I (tangentially) work with a lot of rail people and they're terrified about what the huge reduction in commuting will mean for the economics of providing a rail service, and that's a genuine tough one - I want a rail service to be there for my occasional use, but occasional use isn't what funds it (public subsidy aside) in the current model.

Going to be a big challenge for local and national governments, but boiling it down to "WFH good" and "WFH bad" ignores a lot of complex nuances.

That said, there isn't a violin small enough for the complaints of commercial landlords.
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Legends-Lounge

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« Reply #34279 on: Tuesday, March 2, 2021, 13:36:41 »

They undoubtedly will, its a big cost that many companies have realised that they don't really need.

I have bee WFH since 2015 when I dropped off the commuter treadmill into Manchester, gets a bit lonely at times (but that's what the TEF is for innit. Speak to colleagues on the phone very regularly through the day, plus the wife works from home as well (hence building a home office for me in the garden!)

From working in the sector what I see happening is a reduction in the big dick replacement corporate headquarters with smaller regional offices being open for hot desking. I imagine the big CBD's of this world, so CW in London and Spinningfields in Manchester will remain little altered, but the smaller provincial offices in towns will rapidly move over to residential use using the PD rights that already exist, which could also go some way to addressing a lot of housing shortages.

I did proper hot desking for a few years when I worked in  Wigan, albeit I spent most of my time driving 30odd k miles a year, it was a bit of a waste of time as everyone sat in the same places all the time anyway!

Working practices are changing and there is little anyone can do about it.

Companies reducing bricks and mortar nationally on a large scale will effect their balance sheets. To suddenly find hundreds, more likely thousands of empty office and retail spaces empty at the same time will drive down their freehold values. On the flip side it could and should feee some of these to be converted into housing.
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Samdy Gray
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« Reply #34280 on: Tuesday, March 2, 2021, 13:38:53 »

Paradoxically, it could be a kickstart for town centre regenerations. Turn old corporate buildings into flats/apartments = more people living in town centres = more need for shops/cafes/bars/restaurants.
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Panda Paws
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« Reply #34281 on: Tuesday, March 2, 2021, 13:41:27 »

I've actually just gone remote 4 days a week, with one day a week in Manc on the company's wallet. Perfect set up for me personally.

But we'll see a remigration almost back to previous levels for more organisations I'd imagine. Productivity among junior staff is terrible when everyone's WFH. Does it work for old codgers and experienced pros in some industries? Sure.
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Chubbs

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« Reply #34282 on: Tuesday, March 2, 2021, 14:24:09 »

I wasn't a fan of WFH at first as i enjoyed the office atmosphere and just general change of scenery.
My place of work made the decision a few months back to shut down 90% of the office space and have everyone WFH on a permanent basis even after lockdown/C19 is a thing of the past.
There are obviously some employees on a case by case basis who will still need to work from the office, hence the 10% remaining accessible but once the lease is up on the building i can see us not renewing and just looking for a small managed office space.
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horlock07

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« Reply #34283 on: Tuesday, March 2, 2021, 15:05:24 »

Paradoxically, it could be a kickstart for town centre regenerations. Turn old corporate buildings into flats/apartments = more people living in town centres = more need for shops/cafes/bars/restaurants.

Exactly, just depends if Councils are far sighted enough to see it, a lot can be done without planning permission these days anyway so that will (in theory) accelerate the process.
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Costanza

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« Reply #34284 on: Tuesday, March 2, 2021, 15:46:04 »

When this blows over I'd ideally like to WFH two days per week and I think that'll happen. I haven't seen anyone from my team in person for a year now which is a real shame.

Office culture was generally changing before the pandemic, I was WFH once a week and the dress code was relaxing, it's just hurried things along.

Stuff like awkward handshakes and unnecessary business trips will become a thing of the past (except boardroom level)  Smiley
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ibelieveinmrreeves
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« Reply #34285 on: Tuesday, March 2, 2021, 15:55:16 »

This will be my only experience of WFH, and for the most part I've quite enjoyed it. Been able to get up later, have a more relaxed start of the day, take the kids to nursery, go to the toilet when I want etc. Teaching via Teams hasn't always been straightforward, but I could see it being easier if it were to go on longer.

Back to a bell dictating when I can piss next week  Banana
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« Reply #34286 on: Tuesday, March 2, 2021, 16:00:01 »

Paradoxically, it could be a kickstart for town centre regenerations. Turn old corporate buildings into flats/apartments = more people living in town centres = more need for shops/cafes/bars/restaurants.
This is very much what I'd hope. It could breathe new life into town centres.
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Batch
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« Reply #34287 on: Tuesday, March 2, 2021, 16:35:59 »

Want a mix of home and office work (3/2).

I miss seeing people more than I thought my introverted self would.

Can see the office going when the lease break clause kicks in. Which means going to South Wales for an office , which is less desirable.

Assuming I still have a job of course

We'll see what the future holds.
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NotHarryAgombar

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« Reply #34288 on: Tuesday, March 2, 2021, 17:04:37 »

I think the view of most on here on home v office working is skewed by our ages.
Those of us with houses / partners etc are happy to avoid the commute save costs and time.
Younger people starting out - those aged 18-30 say - will feel different as for that age group the office also links to social lives after work, as well as the opportunity to learn / build networks to help advance their careers. The other issue is if they are sharing a house with several others, , trying to work from home will be a nightmare when taking calls etc.
I think there will be a mixed approach to be honest, with more homeworking than before but nowhere near 100%.
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Arriba

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« Reply #34289 on: Tuesday, March 2, 2021, 17:43:13 »

I don't want to work at all.
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