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Author Topic: Trivial things you don't understand/mildly annoy you  (Read 3872287 times)
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« Reply #35790 on: Monday, November 22, 2021, 15:18:54 »

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I think some USA insurance companies did start to refuse to pay for Hospital visits if the individual was unvaccinated.  Pricey business if you are not covered.
from what I've seen, pricey business if you are!

the price of a simple inhaler a friend gets is eye watering.

crap insurance???
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horlock07

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« Reply #35791 on: Monday, November 22, 2021, 15:24:17 »

I think some USA insurance companies did start to refuse to pay for Hospital visits if the individual was unvaccinated.  Pricey business if you are not covered.

Rob

Just out of interest roughly does your US medical insurance cost PA, saw some figures online and they were eye watering (and rather relevant considering where the UK is heading?)
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RobertT

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« Reply #35792 on: Monday, November 22, 2021, 16:42:04 »

Rob

Just out of interest roughly does your US medical insurance cost PA, saw some figures online and they were eye watering (and rather relevant considering where the UK is heading?)

I pay about $310 every two weeks into an Employer funded scheme, so they essentially group everyone together and spread the cost like a mini Govt, with them adding in a bit to top that up and it becomes an incentive when hiring.

Then we have an individual annual maximum Out of Pocket, ours is $3.5k, or a Family maximum of $7k.  So long as the treatment is covered by the insurer and we use a healthcare provider and professional who takes that insurance, that's the most we pay (on top of the monthly payment via work).

You can choose to have a lower monthly payment, but it pushes the Out of Packet maximum higher (which works like an Excess).

My coverage is pretty good - that is not the case for everyone.  When my daughter collapsed and complained of pain in her arms we took her to the ER.  She was whisked straight into a private room and had tests completed in less than hour and seen by a Consultant.  My wife said there were others stuck on beds in the corridors who hadn't moved in the time she was there - we assume lacking good insurance.  Her bill was $3k for a three hour visit - we paid $600 of that I think - insurers pick up tha tab, but they have reduced rates for in network facilities, which is lower than the rate charged if you were not insured!  It is not unheard of for people in smaller companies (where insurance is not mandated) to risk having zero insurance knowing that the year they get a big bill they will essentially file for bankruptcy.
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horlock07

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« Reply #35793 on: Monday, November 22, 2021, 17:32:41 »

I pay about $310 every two weeks into an Employer funded scheme, so they essentially group everyone together and spread the cost like a mini Govt, with them adding in a bit to top that up and it becomes an incentive when hiring.

Then we have an individual annual maximum Out of Pocket, ours is $3.5k, or a Family maximum of $7k.  So long as the treatment is covered by the insurer and we use a healthcare provider and professional who takes that insurance, that's the most we pay (on top of the monthly payment via work).

You can choose to have a lower monthly payment, but it pushes the Out of Packet maximum higher (which works like an Excess).

My coverage is pretty good - that is not the case for everyone.  When my daughter collapsed and complained of pain in her arms we took her to the ER.  She was whisked straight into a private room and had tests completed in less than hour and seen by a Consultant.  My wife said there were others stuck on beds in the corridors who hadn't moved in the time she was there - we assume lacking good insurance.  Her bill was $3k for a three hour visit - we paid $600 of that I think - insurers pick up tha tab, but they have reduced rates for in network facilities, which is lower than the rate charged if you were not insured!  It is not unheard of for people in smaller companies (where insurance is not mandated) to risk having zero insurance knowing that the year they get a big bill they will essentially file for bankruptcy.

Cheers, so about £450 a month, bugger me, sobering thought.

Thanks.
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jayohaitchenn
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« Reply #35794 on: Monday, November 22, 2021, 19:12:46 »

Cheers, so about £450 a month, bugger me, sobering thought.

Thanks.

Yeah but wages are better and taxes are lower
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Red Frog
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« Reply #35795 on: Monday, November 22, 2021, 19:26:53 »

Yeah but wages are better and taxes are lower

You just pay differently. And more, all in all. It's what happens when you think anything else is "socialism".
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« Reply #35796 on: Monday, November 22, 2021, 19:52:22 »

Yeah but wages are better and taxes are lower

It's an interesting subject.  I pay x3 the rate of Council Tax in a Property Tax, in NY it can be much higher.  I also pay Federal and State income Tax and car insurance is insane - currently paying $166 per month for two cars, it was $400 a month when I first arrived, and that is with pretty minimal coverage (you have to determine how much you want to insure against for personal injury for example).

I think the Tax works out a little lower overall, especially for higher earners.  That doesn't mean there aren't ways of getting your money from you!  We have to buy school supplies for example.
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jayohaitchenn
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« Reply #35797 on: Monday, November 22, 2021, 23:08:20 »

Yeah I would not want to live there.
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Nomoreheroes
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« Reply #35798 on: Tuesday, November 23, 2021, 08:41:20 »

Yeah I would not want to live there.
I would! Depending on where you live and whether you have an escape clause to come back
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« Reply #35799 on: Tuesday, November 23, 2021, 08:42:30 »

Nope, not for me.
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horlock07

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« Reply #35800 on: Tuesday, November 23, 2021, 09:46:00 »

Yeah but wages are better and taxes are lower

Possibly (I honestly don't know enough about the states to comment) my thought was more about the creeping privatisation of the NHS and what that could cost us, I do not think for one minute taxes would be reduced over here to compensate?
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jayohaitchenn
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« Reply #35801 on: Tuesday, November 23, 2021, 10:09:31 »

Of course not!
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The Artist Formerly Known as Audrey

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« Reply #35802 on: Tuesday, November 23, 2021, 10:55:21 »

Strangely, the NHS can have a detrimental effect. It is so ingrained in people not to expect to pay anything, ever, for their wellbeing they wouldn’t even think to go private for minor ailments when many can well afford to do so.

Mrs Audrey fell off a ladder a few weeks ago and badly bruised one of her boobs. After a couple of days she could feel a lump in it. Instead of waiting weeks for a GPs appointment, then a referral, then an ultrasound, then waiting for the result she took herself off to a clinic here, paid €80 for an ultrasound and got the result there and then. Done and dusted in less than an hour.

Most women would worry greatly about funding a breast lump and to get it sorted so quickly was huge for her.

And for relatively little cost.
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« Reply #35803 on: Tuesday, November 23, 2021, 11:48:17 »

Strangely, the NHS can have a detrimental effect. It is so ingrained in people not to expect to pay anything, ever, for their wellbeing they wouldn’t even think to go private for minor ailments when many can well afford to do so.

Mrs Audrey fell off a ladder a few weeks ago and badly bruised one of her boobs. After a couple of days she could feel a lump in it. Instead of waiting weeks for a GPs appointment, then a referral, then an ultrasound, then waiting for the result she took herself off to a clinic here, paid €80 for an ultrasound and got the result there and then. Done and dusted in less than an hour.

Most women would worry greatly about funding a breast lump and to get it sorted so quickly was huge for her.

And for relatively little cost.

Trouble is Aud, it wouldn’t cost £80/€80 here. You are sometimes looking close to £300/£400 sometimes even £500 for scans etc.
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horlock07

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« Reply #35804 on: Tuesday, November 23, 2021, 11:50:17 »

Strangely, the NHS can have a detrimental effect. It is so ingrained in people not to expect to pay anything, ever, for their wellbeing they wouldn’t even think to go private for minor ailments when many can well afford to do so.

Mrs Audrey fell off a ladder a few weeks ago and badly bruised one of her boobs. After a couple of days she could feel a lump in it. Instead of waiting weeks for a GPs appointment, then a referral, then an ultrasound, then waiting for the result she took herself off to a clinic here, paid €80 for an ultrasound and got the result there and then. Done and dusted in less than an hour.

Most women would worry greatly about funding a breast lump and to get it sorted so quickly was huge for her.

And for relatively little cost.

Not sure how many European systems work, but my old man found the French system to be similarly efficient.

However £67 is not the sort of money a lot of the population will have knocking about sadly.
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