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Author Topic: Calling former smokers  (Read 626 times)
tj2002

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« Reply #15 on: Friday, October 9, 2020, 09:51:28 »

The point of the book is you make the decision to stop, then read it while you are smoking. You only stop AFTER reading it.

I don't want to spoil it for Mr Hunk, although its not a thriller or a real page turner and there is no magical ending. I thought it was written in a really arrogant style, but it was effective.

Mr Hunk has nothing to lose. He might as well waste his time reading it - What's the worst that can happen? He's killing himself slowly and reducing the length of his life by ingesting poison every day anyway. So if he wastes a few days reading a book then what's the issue?  [Its that sort of style]

There is a section in the book on 'substitutes' and 'wonder drugs'. Glad they worked with you Flash, but no way was I going to risk the side effects of what was available at the time for me.

I found the book a massive help in 'reframing' how I thought about smoking. It gives you a different internal dialogue to have with yourself when you think about lighting up or are around smoking.

The crux of it is that stopping smoking isn't actually hard to do, the withdrawal symptoms are mild and you just have to keep making the decision not to do it until they subside.

It's not a magic cure but if you genuinely want to quit I would highly recommend reading it, sorted me out after several half arsed attempts .

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4D

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« Reply #16 on: Friday, October 9, 2020, 10:00:51 »

Out of interest, why? We don't know anywhere near enough yet whether it's damaging or not.

Exactly
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Abrahammer

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« Reply #17 on: Friday, October 9, 2020, 10:10:11 »

Out of interest, why? We don't know anywhere near enough yet whether it's damaging or not.

The overwhelming consensus is that there are little, if any, negative side effects to it. Yes there is the odd expert who says it could be bad for you but you can probably find some ďexpertĒ in this day and age who will say fruit and veg is bad for you!

Youíre right though, potential serious side effects could take years to come to light but in 15-20 years Iíll be knocking on and probably wonít give a shit at that stage of life

Vaping has done the job for me so far
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Flashheart

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« Reply #18 on: Friday, October 9, 2020, 10:13:05 »

John Hopkins don't agree it is safe

https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/wellness-and-prevention/5-truths-you-need-to-know-about-vaping
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I like it firm and fruity.
Abrahammer

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« Reply #19 on: Friday, October 9, 2020, 10:17:58 »

So still considerably safer than the real thing though, Iíll take that

Iím not aiming to live a squeaky clean lifestyle because Iíd fail that miserably in other areas
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Hunk

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« Reply #20 on: Friday, October 9, 2020, 10:20:27 »

Some great advice there . I'm going to go for the Allen Carr book I think, and probably compliment it with a vape, at least to start with. I'm not a particularly heavy smoker, maybe 10 a day so I'm pretty confident I can kick it.

Will avoid the Champix, I have quite a complicated relationship with sleep and the idea of getting out of control dreams is a bit worrying, but thanks anyway.
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4D

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« Reply #21 on: Friday, October 9, 2020, 10:20:31 »

I'd rather breathe air than an alternative to smoking. Still a habit.
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SleafordRobin

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« Reply #22 on: Friday, October 9, 2020, 11:37:19 »

I was 30 a day for 30 years, had a bit of a scare & tried Champix.  That wasn't a pleasant experience, but did the trick.  The best thing at the time was you were still smoking, but inadvertently cutting down, eventually until you stop.  Like others have stated, after about 4-6 months became desperate for a smoke (I actually enjoyed smoking). Remembered my lad had bought me an e-cig a while before to get me to stop, but I didn't get the same satisfaction.  I used this rather than light up & been vaping since (8 years). A word of warning, I'm addicted to Vaping & carry it everywhere & puff more than I smoked, albeit in shorter bursts. .  Good luck!
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« Reply #23 on: Friday, October 9, 2020, 12:18:54 »

I found the book a massive help in 'reframing' how I thought about smoking. It gives you a different internal dialogue to have with yourself when you think about lighting up or are around smoking.

The crux of it is that stopping smoking isn't actually hard to do, the withdrawal symptoms are mild and you just have to keep making the decision not to do it until they subside.

It's not a magic cure but if you genuinely want to quit I would highly recommend reading it, sorted me out after several half arsed attempts .
I also found this. I think the main thing I got from it was the realisation that it was far more a habit than an addiction and I'd been using that word "addiction" as an excuse to hide behind. I stopped while we were away on holiday, the idea being it might be easier in a less stressful environment than the normal day to day. Smoked for the first week while I read the book, finished the book, packed in smoking at the start of the second week and not looked back.
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The Grim Reaper

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« Reply #24 on: Friday, October 9, 2020, 12:46:30 »

Ex 20 a day smoker for nearly 30 years. Apart from the smoking I didnít drink much and eat quite healthy. Was also quite active sport wise, and job wise.
 One day I was jogging up my stairs in the house to get something from the bedroom, I never made it. I become conscious again in hospital after having a mass heart attack. I was 45 years old. After all the hospital checks by the doctors it was apparent my heart was objecting. Nothing like being told by a doctor that if you donít change your ways, you wonít survive a second. Iíve been smoke free since, no alternatives required.
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Hunk

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« Reply #25 on: Friday, October 9, 2020, 12:49:11 »

I was 30 a day for 30 years, had a bit of a scare & tried Champix.  That wasn't a pleasant experience, but did the trick.  The best thing at the time was you were still smoking, but inadvertently cutting down, eventually until you stop.  Like others have stated, after about 4-6 months became desperate for a smoke (I actually enjoyed smoking). Remembered my lad had bought me an e-cig a while before to get me to stop, but I didn't get the same satisfaction.  I used this rather than light up & been vaping since (8 years). A word of warning, I'm addicted to Vaping & carry it everywhere & puff more than I smoked, albeit in shorter bursts. .  Good luck!

Getting one after work today, actually looking forward to it. Im curious to see whether I'll get the same 'kick' from doing it

I also found this. I think the main thing I got from it was the realisation that it was far more a habit than an addiction and I'd been using that word "addiction" as an excuse to hide behind. I stopped while we were away on holiday, the idea being it might be easier in a less stressful environment than the normal day to day. Smoked for the first week while I read the book, finished the book, packed in smoking at the start of the second week and not looked back.

I think its just the habit with me too, but I've not made any attempt to stop smoking since I started 10 years ago so I won't know if its the nicotine I need or whether its the comfort of the repetition, if that makes sense. I'll download the audiobook version of the Allen Carr thingy later
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Hunk

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« Reply #26 on: Friday, October 9, 2020, 12:50:26 »

Ex 20 a day smoker for nearly 30 years. Apart from the smoking I didnít drink much and eat quite healthy. Was also quite active sport wise, and job wise.
 One day I was jogging up my stairs in the house to get something from the bedroom, I never made it. I become conscious again in hospital after having a mass heart attack. I was 45 years old. After all the hospital checks by the doctors it was apparent my heart was objecting. Nothing like being told by a doctor that if you donít change your ways, you wonít survive a second. Iíve been smoke free since, no alternatives required.

Christ, sorry to hear that happened to you. Food for thought
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RedRag

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« Reply #27 on: Friday, October 9, 2020, 13:30:40 »

Was near 20 a day for near 20 years.  Giving up starts with finding a reason to do so that strikes a chord with you personally.  I'd tried once before on the basis of common sense alone, used willpower and lasted about 2 weeks.  I then bought a pack of 10, smoked one and threw the rest away.

For me there were 3 logical reasons to give up.  1.  Health (but I performed ok at squash and 5 a side).  2.   Money (it was starting to be a real waste but I could afford it month to month).  3.  lack of self control.  

No. 3 did it for me.  It was becoming unfashionable and I realised that, at the office or in other non smoking environments, I would be scheming when to have my next ciggie.  In other wo when I wasn't smoking, I was nevertheless often thinking about opportunities to smoke.  I realised that was intolerable and gave up successfully through willpower.  Really after a month or so it gets easier.  I'd say it took 2 or 3 months before I felt safe and my cravings had disappeared.  It's been easy ever since.  The health scare probably works best but, ideally, you give up before.

My wife vaped and that worked for her.  She gave up with the refills after a while and then the whole process.

It's hard work but it does, in my experience, become quite easy after a really short time.  Give it a day at a time, a week at a time, a month at a time and, before you know, it becomes easy.  First, just look for a reason that resonates with you.  Allen Carr might help?
« Last Edit: Friday, October 9, 2020, 13:32:56 by RedRag » Logged
china red

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« Reply #28 on: Friday, October 9, 2020, 13:40:55 »

Gave up for five years, restarted and then now havenít smoked in 8 years.  Pure and utter will power, it isnít easy so you need to really want it.  I used patches for the first month each time, was a total and utter bell end and started eating a lot more.

Still 100% worth it
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Flashheart

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« Reply #29 on: Friday, October 9, 2020, 13:43:19 »

I had to stop for my health in the short term as well as the long term.

I was barely eating and well skinny. I'd also randomly throw up (nothing) sometimes, which was far from ideal when in meetings with clients.
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I like it firm and fruity.
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