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Author Topic: Switching from a mountain bike to a hybrid bike  (Read 2053 times)
mystical_goat

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« Reply #15 on: Saturday, June 6, 2020, 00:39:51 »

Turns out my cycle2work scheme is tied to Evans Cycles. They seem a bit more expensive to begin with (though may be superior quality?) and mostly out of stock due to unprecedented demand since lockdown.

I've always had pretty good service from Evans. Mike Ashley owns them now.

*EDIT*

I've always had pretty good service from Evans but Mike Ashley owns them now.
« Last Edit: Saturday, June 6, 2020, 09:07:37 by mystical_goat » Logged
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Thingie

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« Reply #16 on: Saturday, June 6, 2020, 12:32:41 »

I used Evans for my Trek MTB, their scheme at that time was cheapest compared to the alternative the company offered.

but that was pre-ashley
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Nomoreheroes
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« Reply #17 on: Saturday, June 6, 2020, 14:29:41 »

Turns out my cycle2work scheme is tied to Evans Cycles. They seem a bit more expensive to begin with (though may be superior quality?) and mostly out of stock due to unprecedented demand since lockdown.
No. Not superior quality.

As other have said - Decathlon is your friend.
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Mother Brown

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« Reply #18 on: Saturday, June 6, 2020, 17:32:13 »

That's saved me a few hundred notes, 26 on new city tyres and I cleaned and serviced the bike. Not bad for a 12 year old bike

Probably a stupid question. Apart from fitting new brake blocks and spraying a bit of Wd 40 0n the chain,
what else is involved servicing a bike ?



 
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Flashheart

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« Reply #19 on: Saturday, June 6, 2020, 17:37:02 »

Probably a stupid question. Apart from fitting new brake blocks and spraying a bit of Wd 40 0n the chain,
what else is involved servicing a bike ?


New cables and readujsting gears are often necessary. And making sure that everything is well oiled. There's sometimes a lot of faffing about to be done.
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4D

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« Reply #20 on: Saturday, June 6, 2020, 17:44:41 »

Adjusted the brake cables, adjusted the gear cables to align them correctly, oiled the chain etc.
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Mother Brown

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« Reply #21 on: Saturday, June 6, 2020, 18:09:38 »

As you can probably tell, I am not a keen cyclist.
The last bike I rode had a 3 speed Sturmey  Archer.
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bamboonoshop

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« Reply #22 on: Saturday, June 6, 2020, 21:48:44 »

I've got a bike,
I could ride it if I like...

Ok not a play on Pink Floyd lyrics but I genuinely have a bike that I'd like to ride. I "inherited" it when I moved to my new place. It needs the usual stuff doing to it to get it roadworthy but there's one much bigger problem. The main central column, that the handlebars sit on, they're loose, very loose and turn independently to the main shaft.

Essentially, I have zero control over steering. I know I need to align it and there is a nut I need to tighten which I've tried doing but it doesn't seem to want to shift so unsure if it's the correct nut or I need something with a bit more purchase so I can tap it round with a hammer.

I'm also not hugely "bikey" due to more naturally slower twitch hamstrings, which with prolonged cycling fucks them up an needs longer recovery. It's a bit of a pain in the ass because I'm not bad at spinning/intensive training but, yeah. It then sets me back from running/long distance hiking and I much prefer and have stamina for the latter. But anyway, I'd quite like to use the bike for shorter/less intense/more leisurely rides from times to time.

So any help from the bicycle nerds would be great.
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Nomoreheroes
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« Reply #23 on: Sunday, June 7, 2020, 08:02:14 »

I've got a bike,
I could ride it if I like...

Ok not a play on Pink Floyd lyrics but I genuinely have a bike that I'd like to ride. I "inherited" it when I moved to my new place. It needs the usual stuff doing to it to get it roadworthy but there's one much bigger problem. The main central column, that the handlebars sit on, they're loose, very loose and turn independently to the main shaft.

Essentially, I have zero control over steering. I know I need to align it and there is a nut I need to tighten which I've tried doing but it doesn't seem to want to shift so unsure if it's the correct nut or I need something with a bit more purchase so I can tap it round with a hammer.

I'm also not hugely "bikey" due to more naturally slower twitch hamstrings, which with prolonged cycling fucks them up an needs longer recovery. It's a bit of a pain in the ass because I'm not bad at spinning/intensive training but, yeah. It then sets me back from running/long distance hiking and I much prefer and have stamina for the latter. But anyway, I'd quite like to use the bike for shorter/less intense/more leisurely rides from times to time.

So any help from the bicycle nerds would be great.
What is the bike? Or could you post a picture. Difficult to explain without seeing as there are a couple of different types.
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ron dodgers

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« Reply #24 on: Sunday, June 7, 2020, 18:32:04 »

is it's an old bike then it's probably a quill stem, sort of bolt through a wedgy thing, just loosen the top bolt, pull it out give it a clean, grease and re-tighten. If it's an a-head with a star fangled nut (frictiony type steel thingy) buy another one and reset it ( with a bit of tube and a small hammer). You can buy different ahead fasteners if you want ( compressed with rubber, I think)
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bamboonoshop

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« Reply #25 on: Sunday, June 7, 2020, 19:46:49 »

Will post a pic in a bit but I think it's a relatively cheap Sceptre Challenge or Challenge Sceptre?

Oh and it's the column that leads into the main shaft that is loose not the part that connects to the handlebars if that makes sense? So of the "r" shaped column, it's the "stem" leading into the main shaft that is loose and not the "leaf" that brackets onto the handlebars.
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Nomoreheroes
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« Reply #26 on: Sunday, June 7, 2020, 19:52:59 »

Will post a pic in a bit but I think it's a relatively cheap Sceptre Challenge or Challenge Sceptre?

Oh and it's the column that leads into the main shaft that is loose not the part that connects to the handlebars if that makes sense? So of the "r" shaped column, it's the "stem" leading into the main shaft that is loose and not the "leaf" that brackets onto the handlebars.
Try this:
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bamboonoshop

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« Reply #27 on: Sunday, June 7, 2020, 20:06:41 »

Try this:

Thanks but this bike doesn't have that type of fixing on the headset. The central column (the stem) goes into the shaft. ie there's no bracket and top cap that go around the shaft like int the vid? Hmmm
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horlock07

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« Reply #28 on: Sunday, June 7, 2020, 21:15:24 »

Quill stem?
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Nomoreheroes
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« Reply #29 on: Sunday, June 7, 2020, 23:05:27 »

Quill stem?
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