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herthab
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« Reply #345 on: Sunday, June 4, 2017, 07:43:07 »

"That's liquid football!"
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mystical_goat


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« Reply #346 on: Sunday, June 4, 2017, 18:00:03 »

Mid Morning Matters is some of the best Partridge, imo. Just in the radio studio so a pure focus on that, seems to lead to some great writing.
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Ells


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« Reply #347 on: Thursday, August 24, 2017, 19:53:57 »

Bumpity bumping this thread as I need some new material.

Found Ruud Gullit's How to watch football for 3 during the week and enjoying it so far.

Anyone read anything good lately?
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StfcRusty


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« Reply #348 on: Thursday, August 24, 2017, 20:54:09 »

Bumpity bumping this thread as I need some new material.

Found Ruud Gullit's How to watch football for 3 during the week and enjoying it so far.

Anyone read anything good lately?

Lutz Pfannenstiel's "the unstoppable keeper" about the worldwide travels of a journeyman goalkeeper is a riotous read and includes going to prison for suspected match-fixing, dying on the pitch due to Clayton Donaldson and stealing an actual penguin. Yes, really.

He's now a bigwig at Hoffenheim and media darling, which given his lowly career achievements is pretty remarkable in itself.
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Ells


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« Reply #349 on: Thursday, August 24, 2017, 22:35:37 »

Lutz Pfannenstiel's "the unstoppable keeper" about the worldwide travels of a journeyman goalkeeper is a riotous read and includes going to prison for suspected match-fixing, dying on the pitch due to Clayton Donaldson and stealing an actual penguin. Yes, really.

He's now a bigwig at Hoffenheim and media darling, which given his lowly career achievements is pretty remarkable in itself.

You had me at penguin, thanks mate. Grin less than 3 quid for the ebook too.
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Legends-Lounge


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« Reply #350 on: Thursday, August 24, 2017, 23:58:25 »

Yanis Varoufakis. Name ring a bell? The ex Greek Finance Minister who tried to negotiate and reason with the ECB, IMF and others over the Greek debt issue.

The book is called - And The Weak Must Suffer What They Must. (Europe, Austerity, And The Threat To Global Stabilty)

Oh boy, although politically he and I are at different ends in our politics, I do feel for the bloke and all the linked countries. What a fucking basket case and reinforces my long held belief not to trust the EU as a whole and thank fuck McBrown (save the world McBrown) who refused to let Bliar shoehorn us into the .

Nearly finished it and will read it again after because it does go through and awful lot of stuff. After that I couldn't help pick up his next tome, hopefully a gem - Adults In The Room (My Battle With Europe's Deep Establishment) at Gatwick, just been to busy getting dizzy in the Florida Theme Parks.

Happy reading folks.
« Last Edit: Friday, August 25, 2017, 05:42:08 by Legends-Lounge » Logged
Wilf Shergold


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« Reply #351 on: Friday, August 25, 2017, 10:14:48 »

Ian Buruma - Year Zero: A History of 1945. Finally got around to reading this (been out a couple of years) after it was recommended to me by a historian chap.

I'm no historian but being born in the '50s I've clearly been sold the whole goodies v baddies WW2 story. This book shows that wasn't necessary the case, certainly as the war ended. A real eye-opener, turned a lot of my assumptions on their head. 'We', the goodies, did some unmentionable acts that if Hitler or the Japs had done them we'd be outraged.

In my local library (Taunton) but less than a fiver 2nd hand. Oh, and not the sort of book to read on the beach, unless you want to be the miserable depressed sod in the family.

Anyone else read this?
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Samdy Gray
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« Reply #352 on: Friday, August 25, 2017, 10:34:40 »

I'm trying to get through 26 books this year. Currently at 17, but in danger of falling behind schedule because a couple have taken me a while to get through.

As a bit of a completionist, once I've started a book I can't not finish it even if it's a slog to get through.

As someone who's read most of the books you list in your previous post, and I find myself always reading self-improvement and pop-psychology, here's a few you may fancy having a read of.

2 of my personal favourites:



Other books I'd recommend are:

And a book I've recently finished and loved (he has a great writing style) is:

In the above book Altucher mentions this in glowing terms, and I've just got it, but yet to start:

Completely missed this post from Barry which was in follow up to mine. I've actually read through all of these books in the last 18 months. As a serial procrastinator, Now Habit was probably my favourite out of the list.
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Reg Smeeton
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« Reply #353 on: Friday, August 25, 2017, 10:42:53 »

Ian Buruma - Year Zero: A History of 1945. Finally got around to reading this (been out a couple of years) after it was recommended to me by a historian chap.

I'm no historian but being born in the '50s I've clearly been sold the whole goodies v baddies WW2 story. This book shows that wasn't necessary the case, certainly as the war ended. A real eye-opener, turned a lot of my assumptions on their head. 'We', the goodies, did some unmentionable acts that if Hitler or the Japs had done them we'd be outraged.

In my local library (Taunton) but less than a fiver 2nd hand. Oh, and not the sort of book to read on the beach, unless you want to be the miserable depressed sod in the family.

Anyone else read this?

Sounds dangerous.... you'll be wanting to knock down Nelson's Column next.
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Loobug


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« Reply #354 on: Friday, August 25, 2017, 20:40:03 »

I've discovered audible this year. Got a subscription as a leaving gift at my last job. I previously read about three books a year but audible makes it so much easier and I've done about 20+ now. Not cheap, mind you but there are always various offers. I recommend checking it out if reading a book isn't your thing..
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Ells


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« Reply #355 on: Friday, August 25, 2017, 23:30:16 »

I'm trying to get through 26 books this year. Currently at 17, but in danger of falling behind schedule because a couple have taken me a while to get through.

As a bit of a completionist, once I've started a book I can't not finish it even if it's a slog to get through.

Completely missed this post from Barry which was in follow up to mine. I've actually read through all of these books in the last 18 months. As a serial procrastinator, Now Habit was probably my favourite out of the list.

Why 26? I went for 50 this year but I've been wildly ambitious.. I think I'm currently on about, well, 26 probably. I am the same when it comes to completing books though, the last book I think I ditched without reading was the Da Vinci Code.

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Amir


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« Reply #356 on: Saturday, August 26, 2017, 08:22:20 »


Anyone read anything good lately?

Nomad

noun
3. Scottish: 'not mad'.


That made me laugh more than some books that have been described as 'laugh out loud funny' or 'people will look at you strangely on the train if you read this riotous yarn', and the book hasn't even begun.

Bone Clocks by David Mitchell next, and I've loved everything he's written, except for Ghostwritten.
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Samdy Gray
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« Reply #357 on: Saturday, August 26, 2017, 10:58:08 »

Why 26? I went for 50 this year but I've been wildly ambitious..

A book a fortnight. Seemed like a reasonably achievable target.
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pauld


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« Reply #358 on: Thursday, November 2, 2017, 11:59:08 »

David Squires' new book of football cartoons is out. The only reason for not buying this is if you haven't yet bought the first one, in which case you should buy that and then buy the new one once you've read the first. Sample here:

https://www.theguardian.com/football/ng-interactive/2017/nov/02/david-squires-on-socrates-and-the-corinthians-democracy-movement

Should be straight on the Christmas list for anyone who likes football or laughing. Which now I think about it, probably excludes most people on here, as being a Swindon Town fan you don't get much of either. Just buy the damn thing anyway and enjoy yourselves for once you miserable sods.
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adje


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« Reply #359 on: Thursday, November 2, 2017, 12:52:06 »

Nomad

noun
3. Scottish: 'not mad'.


That made me laugh more than some books that have been described as 'laugh out loud funny' or 'people will look at you strangely on the train if you read this riotous yarn', and the book hasn't even begun.

Bone Clocks by David Mitchell next, and I've loved everything he's written, except for Ghostwritten.

Just finished this after reading slave house.recommended
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