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Author Topic: Dags  (Read 4062 times)
Chunkyhair

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« Reply #15 on: Tuesday, September 17, 2019, 12:27:56 »

We got a rehomed 5 year old Cocker Spaniel 6 weeks ago (rehomed as owners family circumstances changed and unable to look after her as well as they did before). Best thing we ever did, she has a beautiful temperament, is perfectly house trained, and with all KC documentation, vaccination records and the like. If we ever get a dog again that is the route we would take.

Got her through Pets4Homes on web
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pauld

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« Reply #16 on: Tuesday, September 17, 2019, 12:31:12 »

All true and agreeable. It's still a risk in my opinion, but like with any dog it's always a risk when kids are involved!
If you get a rescue dog from a responsible organisation that has been fostered and assessed, there's actually less risk as they will have a good idea of what the dog's temperament is and how it will get on with kids, other dogs, even cats.
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Chubbs

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« Reply #17 on: Tuesday, September 17, 2019, 12:38:33 »

Hadn't thought of the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, friends had a Cocker when I was a kid and she was a good dog, Springers are too big and lively!

Will add that to the list.
Springers can be mental if not cared for correctly. My in laws have had a few springers but all have been trained as gun dogs so are good as gold. The current one is still young so a little lively at times but his discipline is incredible.
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Chubbs

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« Reply #18 on: Tuesday, September 17, 2019, 12:43:36 »

If you get a rescue dog from a responsible organisation that has been fostered and assessed, there's actually less risk as they will have a good idea of what the dog's temperament is and how it will get on with kids, other dogs, even cats.

I agree with sippo, it doesn't matter how well behaved or docile a dog is, there is always a risk especially with smaller children. My in laws springer treats my boys as if they were his own but when my youngest was a baby he would pull the dogs ears and tail and what not. Luckily the dog did fuck all, but you can never be too sure.
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JBZ

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« Reply #19 on: Tuesday, September 17, 2019, 12:46:54 »

We have a beagle rescued from a puppy farm. I heartily recommend rehoming a rescue dog.
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pauld

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« Reply #20 on: Tuesday, September 17, 2019, 12:48:29 »

I agree with sippo, it doesn't matter how well behaved or docile a dog is, there is always a risk especially with smaller children. My in laws springer treats my boys as if they were his own but when my youngest was a baby he would pull the dogs ears and tail and what not. Luckily the dog did fuck all, but you can never be too sure.
Fair enough, but that's a risk with any dog, irrespective of whether they are a rescue or not. I was arguing against his suggestion that rescue dogs are inherently less safe than dogs bought from breeders or (worse) puppy farms. Which I don't think they are if you check out where you are getting your dog from properly. At the end of the day you are bringing a living animal into your family, not a hoover.
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Arriba

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« Reply #21 on: Tuesday, September 17, 2019, 13:14:54 »

I'd definitely go the rehoming route too. If you get one from the dogs trust or blue cross both you and he dog will be assessed before they allow any dog to go to you.
Best thing we ever did getting ours and from the blue cross.

Any dog can bite regardless of where you acquired it. I'd actually say a dog that has been assessed by experts in a rescue centre will be safer than a dog from a breeder in many cases.

I'd also endorse petplan insurance. Ain't the cheapest but they've always paid out when we've needed them to.
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Chubbs

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« Reply #22 on: Tuesday, September 17, 2019, 13:50:41 »

out of curiosity, whats the average "running costs" of your dogs? a breakdown would be great especially insurance.
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REDBUCK

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« Reply #23 on: Tuesday, September 17, 2019, 14:00:24 »

What's a DAG
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pauld

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« Reply #24 on: Tuesday, September 17, 2019, 14:02:38 »

What's a DAG
I seem to remember from Neighbours, it's an Aussie insult
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Chubbs

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« Reply #25 on: Tuesday, September 17, 2019, 14:14:12 »

Snatch: D'ya like dags.
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Arriba

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« Reply #26 on: Tuesday, September 17, 2019, 14:32:13 »

out of curiosity, whats the average "running costs" of your dogs? a breakdown would be great especially insurance.

Depends on if you want to feed your dog a quality diet or the shite supermarkets sell.(A quality diet sees less out the other end) Ditto insurance. The best ones cost more. My dog is coming up to 12 and his insurance is now nearly 50 a month(it goes up every year)
We feed him decent food and it works out about 2.50 a day. Then there's the annual jabs which ain't covered by insurance, excesses if you have to have treatment etc. The biggest factor is that you'll have what is essentially another kid for over a decade. It's a big commitment if you do it right and you have to sacrifice alot in my opinion. I certainly have.
« Last Edit: Tuesday, September 17, 2019, 14:34:38 by Arriba » Logged
swindonmaniac

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« Reply #27 on: Tuesday, September 17, 2019, 14:57:16 »

No they're not, as long as you go via a responsible rehoming organisation. They don't just grab dogs out of the shelters and sling them out to anyone. The dogs will be fostered and assessed to see what kind of home they are suitable for. There are some rescue dogs that need a bit more TLC than others because of their past history but any responsible rehoming organisation will tell you that and wouldn't rehome the dog with you if (e.g.) the dog wasn't good with kids or needed someone to be around most of the day and you are out at work all day. You're far more likely to encounter problems with an irresponsible breeder or puppy farm than a good rehoming organisation.
Very true,  try adopting one and see the amount of questions they ask and the vetting they do.   They would not let a dog go to a family they felt they were not suited to.  Agree, there may be the odd occasion they do get it wrong but would have a rescue dog every time.   Pauld is spot on, plenty of dogs looking for loving homes, you don't need to spend hundreds of pounds to secure a good dog, plenty of dodgy dog dealers and puppy farms out there who will gladly take your money and don't give a shit about the animal you have just purchased.
Go and have a look at any rescue center, you'll be amazed how many loving dogs there are just looking for that forever home.
Got our last Golden Retrevier through a rescue center and although we lost him three years  ago theres not a day go by that I don't think of him, absolutely amazing dog, and our next one will come through a rescue centre again for sure. Many dogs are in there through no fault of their own and are just waiting for a new loving owner.  Please don't waste your money,  these dogs have almost every test done on them, you can almost guarantee they will be far more healthy than a dog you buy over the internet.
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The Artist Formerly Known as Audrey

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« Reply #28 on: Tuesday, September 17, 2019, 15:07:11 »

Without doubt a retired greyhound is a great pet. Universally laid back, loves people, will willingly go for a walk anytime, or just chill out on the sofa - no problem.

Had them for over 20 years - never met a bad one, not once.
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ReadingRed

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« Reply #29 on: Tuesday, September 17, 2019, 15:09:00 »

Agree with everything that's been said on here about adoping a crossbreed and a rescue. Ours came from Many Tears, who rescue dogs from Ireland (they told us that Irish dog wardens put dogs down if not collected within 48 hours, so they have a van rounding them up and bringing them over on the ferry into Wales). He had been fostered for 2 months for assessment before being put up for adoption.

If you're not quite sure about a decade-long commitment to a dog, there are plenty of older dogs needing homes. You can see some at www.oldies.org.uk.
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