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Author Topic: We all dream of a team of McNamees  (Read 1632 times)
donkey
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He headed a football.




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« Reply #30 on: Thursday, November 9, 2017, 17:15:52 »

John Moncur.  I'm not sure how a team of midfield generals would really operate in practice, but it would be interesting to find out.  And JM was awesome.

Was my first thought, too. Ooh, err, John Moncur.
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donkey tells the truth

I headed the ball.

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Exiled Bob


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« Reply #31 on: Thursday, November 9, 2017, 21:25:09 »

Kenny Stroud.
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Amir


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« Reply #32 on: Thursday, November 9, 2017, 21:43:26 »

Paul Allen, C'mon!!!!
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kirky69


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« Reply #33 on: Thursday, November 9, 2017, 22:46:30 »

Brian "animal" Williams.
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Sir Cliff Pipehard


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« Reply #34 on: Friday, November 10, 2017, 10:17:51 »

Maurice Owen fought with Orde Wingate's Chindits in Burma against the Japanese in the jungle.

My great uncle Ernie was a Chindit in Burma.
He got blown up with 10 other blokes in a lorry and was the only survivor.
He went into severe shock and the medical staff had no idea who he was.
It was only when someone turned up from his home village a few months later, and recognized him wandering about the compound that they managed to get him home to recover.
And a few weeks later he was deemed fit enough and was sent back out there!
And got blown up again,less serious this time!
He eventually went on to live well into his 90's and died peacefully,sitting in a deckchair whilst waiting for a cup of tea on a warm afternoon in his daughter's garden.

My vote would be a team of Chris Kamaras

Hard as nails and knows where the net is


 
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Ardiles


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« Reply #35 on: Friday, November 10, 2017, 10:55:01 »

RIP Uncle Ernie.  What a story.
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horlock07


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« Reply #36 on: Friday, November 10, 2017, 10:55:34 »

My great uncle Ernie was a Chindit in Burma.
He got blown up with 10 other blokes in a lorry and was the only survivor.
He went into severe shock and the medical staff had no idea who he was.
It was only when someone turned up from his home village a few months later, and recognized him wandering about the compound that they managed to get him home to recover.
And a few weeks later he was deemed fit enough and was sent back out there!
And got blown up again,less serious this time!
He eventually went on to live well into his 90's and died peacefully,sitting in a deckchair whilst waiting for a cup of tea on a warm afternoon in his daughter's garden.
 

My grand dad fought in Burma as well (did a regiment from Swindon go or something?), although he seemed to have malaria for a lot of the time he was over there, no idea what he actually got up to as he refused to ever speak about it? Sadly got no where near his 90's although that might have been due to beer, ciggies, working inside the works or my nan!
« Last Edit: Friday, November 10, 2017, 11:24:06 by horlock07 » Logged
pauld


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« Reply #37 on: Friday, November 10, 2017, 12:14:55 »

My grandad was in Burma too, with the RAF though, not the Chindits. And then (via some brief home leave) joined in the final push on Berlin in 45 and the occupation afterwards. Also, like Horlock's granddad never really talked about the war, even to my Dad and Aunt, although we do have a couple of photos from Burma, but nothing from Germany. And also like Horlock, nowhere near his 90s, and that was definitely down to booze, ciggies, work and dissolute living. And fucking good on him.

My vote would be for a team of Uncle Ernies, they don't make em like him any more!
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Ardiles


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« Reply #38 on: Friday, November 10, 2017, 12:28:08 »

Can I also join the Grandpa in Burma club?  Mine lasted until his late 80s, and took a contempt for all things Japanese with him to his grave.
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horlock07


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« Reply #39 on: Friday, November 10, 2017, 12:42:30 »

My grandad was in Burma too, with the RAF though, not the Chindits. And then (via some brief home leave) joined in the final push on Berlin in 45 and the occupation afterwards. Also, like Horlock's granddad never really talked about the war, even to my Dad and Aunt, although we do have a couple of photos from Burma, but nothing from Germany. And also like Horlock, nowhere near his 90s, and that was definitely down to booze, ciggies, work and dissolute living. And fucking good on him.

My vote would be for a team of Uncle Ernies, they don't make em like him any more!

Actually done some checking on the family tree as my dad was at one stage well into it, had a computer programme and everything (he discovered we have very boring ancestors originated in Berkshire, moved to Kingston Lisle and came to Swindon when the factory opened and never went anywhere, although we are related to Tony Hatch who wrote the music to Crossroads and Neighbours...) and actually my grand dad was also in the RAF when he went to Burma, although he spent the early years of the war in Oban in Scotland and allegedly, he fathered a child whilst there.
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pauld


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« Reply #40 on: Friday, November 10, 2017, 12:48:52 »

Actually done some checking on the family tree as my dad was at one stage well into it, had a computer programme and everything (he discovered we have very boring ancestors originated in Berkshire, moved to Kingston Lisle and came to Swindon when the factory opened and never went anywhere, although we are related to Tony Hatch who wrote the music to Crossroads and Neighbours...) and actually my grand dad was also in the RAF when he went to Burma, although he spent the early years of the war in Oban in Scotland and allegedly, he fathered a child whilst there.
Cool! My granddad and yours may have fought side by side. And while your grandad moved to Swindon and then you moved to the Northwest (IIRC), mine settled and raised a family in the Northwest, whence I moved to Swindon. We're pretty much mirror images of each other Smiley
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bamboonoshoe


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« Reply #41 on: Friday, November 10, 2017, 14:07:11 »

Cool! My granddad and yours may have fought side by side. And while your grandad moved to Swindon and then you moved to the Northwest (IIRC), mine settled and raised a family in the Northwest, whence I moved to Swindon. We're pretty much mirror images of each other Smiley

Amazing stories RE: Burma.

My Clone XI weoulld have to be Simon Ferry. Loved that guy.
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horlock07


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« Reply #42 on: Friday, November 10, 2017, 14:34:38 »

Cool! My granddad and yours may have fought side by side.

He never mentioned any dodgy scousers....  Wink
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pauld


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« Reply #43 on: Friday, November 10, 2017, 14:45:11 »

He never mentioned any dodgy scousers....  Wink
My grandad wasn't a scouser. He could be a bit dodgy though .... Smiley
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adje


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« Reply #44 on: Friday, November 10, 2017, 23:13:43 »

We all dream of a team of leapy cocks
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