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Author Topic: Laptop wireless connection help request  (Read 1515 times)
stfcinbmth

« Reply #45 on: Friday, July 6, 2012, 13:39:52 »

Get one of the kind souls on here to come and sort it for you
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jonny72

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« Reply #46 on: Friday, July 6, 2012, 14:45:38 »


I'd strongly recommend paying a bit extra and getting a gigabit switch rather than a 100m (Fast Ethernet). Won't make any difference to your internet connection speed, but if you transfer files locally they will move a lot quicker.

Get one of the kind souls on here to come and sort it for you

Or even easier, if your wired connection is working on it then let someone remote in.
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stfcinbmth

« Reply #47 on: Friday, July 6, 2012, 14:50:57 »

Just thinking what about manually setting the wireless IP to something different than the one allocated
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Barry Scott
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« Reply #48 on: Friday, July 6, 2012, 15:15:36 »

I'd strongly recommend paying a bit extra and getting a gigabit switch rather than a 100m (Fast Ethernet). Won't make any difference to your internet connection speed, but if you transfer files locally they will move a lot quicker.

Jonny (and anyone else who knows about switches) why/how does a gigabit switch help when a standard HDD only reads/writes at around 50mb/s at a push? Its a genuine question I'm always puzzled by, because to me I could only imagine 1000mb/s being a benefit to an SSD, clustered servers, remote access or a RAID array. Something to do with through put?
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Peter Venkman

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« Reply #49 on: Friday, July 6, 2012, 15:25:58 »

doh posted in error Smiley

But I agree with Barry, you are limited to your hard drive surely, 1000mbps is about 125MB per second and the average hard disk writes at a max speed of about 50MB per second.

Thus it will cause disk saturation.
« Last Edit: Friday, July 6, 2012, 15:32:00 by JJEdmunds » Logged
jonny72

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« Reply #50 on: Friday, July 6, 2012, 15:42:08 »

Network speeds are quoted in bits rather than bytes, but the actual MB transfer rate won't ever be 1/8th of the speed as you've got to allow for the overheads of network data transfer (encoding, error correction and so on). Probably more accurate to go with 1/10th.

So with a 100m network connection you'll only get about 10Mb, which is a fraction of actual hard disk throughput speeds. Plus you could be reading / writing from multiple drives in a raid which could increase the throughput. Also, not all data transfer will involve hard disk access, i.e. if the data is already in memory.

The other factor is the speed of the uplink between switches. If you connect a 5 port switch to the main switch over a 100m uplink, then that 100m will have to be shared across the 5 ports. So if all ports are running at full speed they'll only get 20m each.

Bottom line is that gigabit switches are dirt cheap so there is no real reason to buy anything less. At minimum you want your main switch to have all gigabit ports and the other switches to have at least one gigabit port for the uplink.
« Last Edit: Friday, July 6, 2012, 15:44:56 by jonny72 » Logged
Barry Scott
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« Reply #51 on: Friday, July 6, 2012, 15:47:36 »

Thanks, that makes sense. Also explains why speeds on my gigabit LAN to a server on a 100/10 card are only around 9-10mbs.
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Samdy Gray
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« Reply #52 on: Friday, July 6, 2012, 16:04:41 »

Network speeds annoy and confuse the fuck out of me.

I'm on 40Mb (megabits) fibre broadband and can easily max that out at ~4.7MB/sec on a cabled 100Mb ethernet connection from the router to the laptop.

Yet, if I try and transfer a file from my laptop to my NAS it peaks at ~4.3MB/sec, so only around 34Mb on a 100Mb connection.
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