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Author Topic: Managerial Migrations 2017-2018, hop on, hop off  (Read 589647 times)
Abrahammer


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« Reply #4365 on: Wednesday, January 24, 2018, 20:05:02 »

The bigger (only imo) controversial aspect should be why was he appointed in the first place?

No experience of womenís game and a dubious short coaching career behind him.
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bennett


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« Reply #4366 on: Wednesday, January 24, 2018, 20:31:14 »

The bigger (only imo) controversial aspect should be why was he appointed in the first place?

No experience of womenís game and a dubious short coaching career behind him.
This, in conjunction with the FA's lack of diligence relating to his silly tweets, makes it a pretty silly appointment
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« Reply #4367 on: Wednesday, January 24, 2018, 22:28:10 »

Greg Clarke pictured at FA HQ, getting ready to unveil yet another stellar coup
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bennett


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« Reply #4368 on: Thursday, January 25, 2018, 06:20:28 »

Why did you have to use the picture with a jazzy tissue front and centre?!
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Don Rogers Sock


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« Reply #4369 on: Thursday, January 25, 2018, 08:51:34 »

The bigger (only imo) controversial aspect should be why was he appointed in the first place?

No experience of womenís game and a dubious short coaching career behind him.
To be be fair he has been assistant manager at 2 very big clubs,won the premier league 10 times and played 60 times for his country. I would say that when we look past all this nonsense he is very well qualified
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pauld


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« Reply #4370 on: Thursday, January 25, 2018, 09:03:57 »

To be be fair he has been assistant manager at 2 very big clubs,won the premier league 10 times and played 60 times for his country. I would say that when we look past all this nonsense he is very well qualified
He's quite well qualified. As a coach. Not as a manager, much less of an international team, and not in women's football. I hope he does well though, seems a likeable enough bloke and seems to know his stuff. The fuck-up here is the FA, not Neville. And tbf he's better qualified than Giggs
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horlock07


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« Reply #4371 on: Thursday, January 25, 2018, 10:20:17 »

Greg Clarke pictured at FA HQ, getting ready to unveil yet another stellar coup


It does seem that the FA are trolling supporters at times these days....

He's quite well qualified. As a coach. Not as a manager, much less of an international team, and not in women's football. I hope he does well though, seems a likeable enough bloke and seems to know his stuff. The fuck-up here is the FA, not Neville. And tbf he's better qualified than Giggs

Just imagine if Giggs had got the job, he would have tried it on with most of the squad by the end of the first training session!
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wheretherealredsare
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« Reply #4372 on: Thursday, January 25, 2018, 10:43:47 »

What one might call a fit of the  Giggles?
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Frigby Daser


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« Reply #4373 on: Thursday, January 25, 2018, 13:26:38 »

The whole debate is rather silly. Itís nonsense to suggest that his experience as a player and coach in the menís game makes him less qualified than even the most experienced individual in the womenís game. His skills are entirely transferable. There are some aspects of the wider debate around sporting equality, such as this, that only serve to undermine the very credible arguments elsewhere. If Mark Ramprakash became England Womenís cricket coach, would there be this debate?

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pauld


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« Reply #4374 on: Thursday, January 25, 2018, 14:21:13 »

The whole debate is rather silly. Itís nonsense to suggest that his experience as a player and coach in the menís game makes him less qualified than even the most experienced individual in the womenís game. His skills are entirely transferable.
His skills as a coach are, of course, transferable but his experience in that role is not extensive, and he has no experience of management. Not does he have any knowledge of women's football which he will of course need in order to be able to perform the role. The game is the same, but he will still need to know who are the up and coming players he should be looking at, cultivate relationships with team managers etc etc. It seems he has been given a role as manager largely based on his profile as a player rather than his (fairly minimal) experience as a coach. Which doesn't mean he'll do a bad job, but equally is no guarantee he'll be any cop whatsoever. There is a fallacy in this country in particular that excellent players make excellent managers and that in order to be a good manager you need to have been a good player. They are two very different skill sets, albeit based in the same domain.
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chalkies_shorts


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« Reply #4375 on: Thursday, January 25, 2018, 14:41:39 »

"There is a fallacy in this country in particular that excellent players make excellent managers and that in order to be a good manager you need to have been a good player. They are two very different skill sets, albeit based in the same domain."

He could make an excellent manager then
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pauld


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« Reply #4376 on: Thursday, January 25, 2018, 14:45:22 »

"There is a fallacy in this country in particular that excellent players make excellent managers and that in order to be a good manager you need to have been a good player. They are two very different skill sets, albeit based in the same domain."

He could make an excellent manager then
Yes of course he could. I hope he does and suspect he will. But we keep fast-tracking ex-players into top management roles in the assumption that a good player will be a good manager. And it quite often isn't the case. In fact, I suspect that some players who could have been good managers if they'd worked their way up actually end up having their management careers strangled at birth by trying to start at too high a level.
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RobertT


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« Reply #4377 on: Thursday, January 25, 2018, 15:23:48 »

If Mark Ramprakash became England Womenís cricket coach, would there be this debate?



I would bloody hope so, have you seen the state of England's top order recently.
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bamboonoshoe


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« Reply #4378 on: Thursday, January 25, 2018, 16:09:55 »

Yes of course he could. I hope he does and suspect he will. But we keep fast-tracking ex-players into top management roles in the assumption that a good player will be a good manager. And it quite often isn't the case. In fact, I suspect that some players who could have been good managers if they'd worked their way up actually end up having their management careers strangled at birth by trying to start at too high a level.

Yeah it's the same old theory; "Some workers on the shop floor will never make good managers."

Some people just aren't cut out for management. No amount of time worked at a lower level can change that. Some obviously are but they also can get missed due to the bureaucracy of "You need to work your way up." While I agree in part, it's an annoying culture because everyone picks up and absorbs information at different rates. You can work for a company at entry level and after two years you may well have realised you're can be better used elsewhere and at a higher level. For the same reason, someone may be in a role at entry level for 20 yrs+ and "know everything". On the contrary, they may know their role but they will have learnt how to cut corners and do the job their way. However, if they have a work friend in an elevated role then it's likely the guy with 20 yrs+ experience will get the job. Many years experience shouldn't translate as good at their job.
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Frigby Daser


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« Reply #4379 on: Thursday, January 25, 2018, 16:30:27 »

Yes of course he could. I hope he does and suspect he will. But we keep fast-tracking ex-players into top management roles in the assumption that a good player will be a good manager. And it quite often isn't the case. In fact, I suspect that some players who could have been good managers if they'd worked their way up actually end up having their management careers strangled at birth by trying to start at too high a level.

I struggle with the fact this has been jumped upon in the media as an example of sexism in sport. The argument against Neville presupposes that only someone who had managed a female side can manage another female side. That contradicts the line of thought that female football is the same game as he menís, equally competitive, complex etc is all respects other than gender. It was only a few years ago that there was media criticism that Hope Powell wasnít being considered for menís football roles. Isnít it now contradictory that the same people are criticising an appointment on the basis that he hasnít got experience of working with a specific gender?
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